May 2017

I have been traveling and teaching the above approach, and making this claim for several years now. Recently, I was privileged to hear from a friend in Arkansas, who took this idea and ran with it. Angie Norman is a nurse

Like many people my age, I am experiencing the deaths of close friends and beloved family members at a fast and furious rate. Sometimes the deaths come after a long and painful dying process. Other times – Poof! People die

After my father died, my sister and I were responsible for deciding what to do with his belongings and closing out his financial affairs. In addition to the zillions of caregiving hours we racked up before Dad’s death, little did

A “Help Wanted” ad to find the perfect family caregiver would read something like this: HELP WANTED Qualifications: Skilled negotiator Demonstrates precise bookkeeping and financial-planning skills Able to juggle multiple schedules and calendars Has reliable car and valid driver's license

The phone rings. It’s Mom. “See you later, Joy. I’m going out now to withdraw cash from the ATM machine.” “Wait! What?” “You heard me. I need cash and I’m heading out the door.” The ATM machine in our Chicago neighborhood is located

Are you in the middle of a major conflict with a parent who refuses to move?   Part Two of this blog series describes my experiences with conversations that go nowhere, accompanied by that hopeless sinking feeling that something bad will soon

As a young child, I don’t know who had more fun on Mother’s Day – Mom or me. I recall reciting poems, drawing pictures on home-made greeting cards, and making my mother breakfast-in-bed to honor her. Nothing made me happier

Grieving the loss of a loved one is an inevitable human experience. As caregivers, whether or not the person who passed away was family, we can be hit hard. Caregiving itself is an emotional experience; watching a person progress through